Online sliding puzzles for kids - Amur Leopard

Posted by Olympiad Tester on


Online sliding puzzles for kids - Amur Leopard will enrich the general knowledge of your child while sharpening his / her analytical skills in a fun manner. These brain games develop the mental ability as well as problem enhancing skills in kids across ages. 

    INSTRUCTIONS TO PLAY THIS ONLINE SLIDING PUZZLE

    STEP1 - Click one of the tiles closest to the empty space to slide it into the empty space.

    Step1
    STEP 2 - Continue clicking the tiles to manipulate them into the empty spaces and form the picture at the right.
    Step2
    STEP 3Solving the puzzle fast and with few moves will give you a higher score.
    Step3


    TIPS TO SOLVE THIS ONLINE SLIDING PUZZLE

    • Most tile sliding puzzles are made up of three rows of three tiles each.Try to get one of the three rows lined up properly regarding tile order anywhere in the puzzle. For example, get the three tiles that go on the bottom row in order, even at the top of the puzzle.
    • Keep this row together as you Consider each piece carefully and try to figure out where it will go in the puzzle. This will help you as you manipulate them into the right place and as you line them up in rows of three.slide the tiles and it will be easier to solve the problem.
    • One of the hardest parts of solving a sliding puzzle is preventing future moves from ruining previous slides. There is nothing more frustating than having to move a new tile in a way that messes up all that you have done before. To prevent this, try to thing ahead and consider what will happen several moves in the future each time you slide a tile.

    People usually think of leopards in the savannas of Africa but in the Russian Far East, a rare subspecies has adapted to life in the temperate forests that make up the northern-most part of the species’ range. Similar to other leopards, the Amur leopard can run at speeds of up to 37 miles per hour. This incredible animal has been reported to leap more than 19 feet horizontally and up to 10 feet vertically.

    The Amur leopard is solitary. Nimble-footed and strong, it carries and hides unfinished kills so that they are not taken by other predators. It has been reported that some males stay with females after mating, and may even help with rearing the young. Several males sometimes follow and fight over a female. They live for 10-15 years, and in captivity up to 20 years. The Amur leopard is also known as the Far East leopard, the Manchurian leopard or the Korean leopard.

    Why are they endangered?

    The Amur leopard is poached largely for its beautiful, spotted fur. In 1999, an undercover investigation team recovered a female and a male Amur leopard skin, which were being sold for $500 and $1,000 respectively in the village of Barabash, not far from the Kedrovaya Pad reserve in Russia.

    Agriculture and villages surround the forests where the leopards live. As a result the forests are relatively accessible, making poaching a problem—not only for the leopards themselves, but also for important prey species, such as roe deer, sika deer and hare, which are hunted by the villagers both for food and cash.




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