Online sliding puzzle for kids - Saola

Posted by Olympiad Tester on


Online sliding puzzle for kids - Saola, will enrich the analytical and problem solving skills of your child. This puzzle for kids on an endangered species will also enrich the general knowledge and awareness. In fact, this is a great brain game for the family to solve together. 

    INSTRUCTIONS TO PLAY THIS ONLINE SLIDING PUZZLE

    STEP1 - Click one of the tiles closest to the empty space to slide it into the empty space.

    Step1
    STEP 2 - Continue clicking the tiles to manipulate them into the empty spaces and form the picture at the right.
    Step2
    STEP 3Solving the puzzle fast and with few moves will give you a higher score.
    Step3


    TIPS TO SOLVE THIS ONLINE SLIDING PUZZLE

    • Most tile sliding puzzles are made up of three rows of three tiles each.Try to get one of the three rows lined up properly regarding tile order anywhere in the puzzle. For example, get the three tiles that go on the bottom row in order, even at the top of the puzzle.
    • Keep this row together as you Consider each piece carefully and try to figure out where it will go in the puzzle. This will help you as you manipulate them into the right place and as you line them up in rows of three.slide the tiles and it will be easier to solve the problem.
    • One of the hardest parts of solving a sliding puzzle is preventing future moves from ruining previous slides. There is nothing more frustating than having to move a new tile in a way that messes up all that you have done before. To prevent this, try to thing ahead and consider what will happen several moves in the future each time you slide a tile.

    The saola was discovered in May 1992 during a joint survey carried out by the Ministry of Forestry of Vietnam and WWF in north-central Vietnam. The team found a skull with unusual long, straight horns in a hunter's home and knew it was something extraordinary. The find proved to be the first large mammal new to science in more than 50 years and one of the most spectacular zoological discoveries of the 20th century.

    Why are they endangered?

    Saola are often caught in snares set in the forest for wild boar, sambar or muntjac deer. Local villagers set some snares for subsistence use and crop protection. Recent increases in lowland people hunting to supply the illegal trade in wildlife has led to a massive increase in hunting, driven by traditional medicine demand in China and restaurant and food markets in Vietnam and Laos.




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